Nahum: The Wrath of God Revealed

The Lord is good,
a refuge in times of trouble.
He cares for those who trust in him,
8 but with an overwhelming flood
he will make an end of Nineveh;
he will pursue his foes into the realm of darkness.

The short book of Nahum describes what Jonah was hoping would happen to Nineveh: No mention or chance of repentance is given: an angry God is completely fed up and completely destroys them. God’s wrathful vengeance obliterates them, and is described in detail worthy of an imaginative Hollywood thriller movie.

It’s interesting to read Jonah and Nahum side by side, for they present quite different understandings of God. In Jonah, love wins. God won’t give up until he has brought his most recalcitrant and fallen creatures into his kingdom. In Nahum, justice wins. The bad guys get what is justly coming to them, and everybody should be happy because they got what they deserved. So which view is correct?

My understanding is that perhaps both views are true, in kind of a Schrödinger’s cat paradox. I’m not sure that from our limited perspective, we can understand the mind of God. How can God be completely just and completely loving at the same time? Don’t these qualities contradict each other? Job certainly understood that dilemma, and found it to be a question that could not be answered by reason, but which could be understood only through relationship.

The best understanding I’ve read (and I wish I could remember where I read it so I could credit the author) is that God’s wrath is really God’s love, seen from a different point of view. Seen from the side of the oppressor, God is acting in punitive anger. Seen from the side of the oppressed, God is acting in liberating love. What the Egyptian slavemasters saw as an expression of God’s wrath, the liberated Hebrews saw as an expression of God’s mercy. This motif is repeated again and again in the Bible, and I think it has continued throughout history for those with eyes to see it.

When the Bible seems to speak with many voices, I don’t see them as contradictions, but as different perspectives. Just because we have difficulty holding two different attributes in our mind at the same time doesn’t mean they aren’t both true. God is both great and good. And that’s good news to me.