Save Us!

Palm Sunday 2020

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away.” This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet: “Say to Daughter Zion, ‘See, your king comes to you, gentle and riding on a donkey, and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.’”The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them for Jesus to sit on. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted, “Hosanna to the Son of David!” “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Hosanna in the highest heaven!” When Jesus entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred and asked, “Who is this?” The crowds answered, “This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galilee.”
-Matthew 21:1-11

If a person not versed in ancient languages were to attempt to decipher the meaning of the word “hosanna” as it is typically used in church services and contemporary worship music, they might guess it means something like “Yay God!”. The word “hosanna” is an English transliteration of the Greek ὡσαννά. In Hebrew, the word is הושיעה נא , which has the root meaning of “save” or “rescue”. That’s how the word is usually translated in the Psalms, where the Psalmist implores God for help.  So when the crowds shouted “Hosanna!” as Jesus rode into Jerusalem, what they were really saying was “Save us!” or “Rescue us!’ It was a cry for help.

Life was not good for the people of God in the first century, and hadn’t been so for centuries as they suffered under the whims of one brutal occupying power after another. They longed for a liberator along the lines of the great military leader and king David, who had reigned a thousand years earlier, and whose memory had faded into the mists of legend. This liberator…this messiah….would drive out those nasty Romans once and for all and peace and prosperity would come again. Everyone would live under their own vine and fig tree, with no one to make them afraid. The miracle-worker Jesus certainly seemed to fit the bill. As a descendent of David, he had the right bloodlines, and he had a reputation for doing things the people liked. He went around the countryside healing people of physical, mental, and spiritual disease, and sometimes providing them with a free lunch as well.  If the rumors were to be believed, he had even raised the dead. No wonder they lined the streets crying, “Hosanna!….Save us!”

But the kind of salvation Jesus was bringing wasn’t what the majority of people expected or wanted. They expected a military messiah who would establish his kingdom by force. Jesus was not that kind of king, and the kingdom of God was and is not that kind of kingdom. The kingdom of God comes not through the love of power, but the power of love. When the ecstatic expectations of the cheering crowd were not realized, they turned into disappointment and then to anger against the one who had not done what they wanted him to do.  And so the same people who shouted “Hosanna” on Palm Sunday were quick to shout “Crucify him!” less than a week later.

It’s the same today, isn’t it? When life becomes hard, we look for a way out. We want God, or the government, or a charismatic leader, somebody, anybody, to get us out of trouble right away. And when that doesn’t happen, or doesn’t happen quickly enough, we tend to get angry, and often at the wrong people.  We have certainly seen this thought process play out in all kinds of ways in the past few months. Some grasp at every straw of a rumor of a quick cure for the coronavirus. Some blame and attack everyone who appears to be of Asian ancestry. Things aren’t the way we expected or wanted them to be, and we are quick to cry out both “Save us now!” and “Crucify!”

The palm-waving crowds were looking for a shortcut into the promised Kingdom of God, which they expected Jesus to deliver quickly and easily and at minimal cost to themselves. I am extremely mistrustful of populism, whether it comes from the right or the left sides of the political spectrum. Populism is quick to jump on board with those who promise easy solutions to difficult problems, and just as quick to abandon ship when the promised salvation does not come quickly or easily., or costs more than we are willing to pay. I wonder how many of the people in that crowd actually paid attention to what Jesus taught. Jesus never promised his followers an easy life.  In fact, he often said that following him would be quite difficult, was not a choice to be made lightly, and that his followers were likely to be quite unpopular.

If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me.”
“You can enter God’s Kingdom only through the narrow gate. The highway to hell is broad, and its gate is wide for the many who choose that way.”
“And whoever does not carry his cross and follow Me cannot be My disciple. Which of you, wishing to build a tower, does not first sit down and count the cost to see if he has the resources to complete it
Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you, and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of Me.…

It’s particularly interesting to note that Jesus’s statement about the narrow and the wide gate in Matthew 7:13 follows directly after he gave us what we have come to call the Golden Rule in Matthew 7:12:“In everything, then, do to others as you would have them do to you. For this is the essence of the Law and the Prophets. ” That sounds so simple, yet in practice is so hard. If we are honest with ourselves, we know that we don’t even come close to living like this. Like the crowds lining the road into Jerusalem, we aren’t looking for someone to save us from our own selfishness, only from the consequences of selfishness. When selfishness is multiplied by a factor equal to the population of the world, a lot of very bad things are the result. Income inequality, crime, pollution, violence and war, global warming…most of the biggest problems we face have their roots in the grasping selfishness that arises from egocentricity. Just imagine what the world might be like if in every situation, everyone followed the Golden Rule. (There would be no hoarding of toilet paper, for one thing!)

Jesus was and is the promised Messiah, but the salvation he brings isn’t what the people of his time expected or wanted, and sometimes I wonder if we don’t make the same mistake today. Jesus didn’t come to make life easy or comfortable for a select few in the short term, but to address the root problem of all that is wrong with everyone in the whole world. He came to set the wheels in motion to correct the world’s trajectory, which was headed toward destruction and death, and set it  instead on a path of “thy kingdom come, thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” And he left us with instructions to follow the trail he blazed for us, to live like he did, to treat others the way he did, with love and compassion and the realization that we are all connected.  “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me.”

Sometimes I also wonder if Jesus didn’t make a mistake by leaving matters in flawed human hands, because we haven’t done such a good job of following the path he laid out for us. We keep wandering off the trail he marked for us into the wilderness of our own self-interest, and getting lost. We can no more follow the one simple rule Jesus gave us than the one simple rule God gave Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. We have not loved God with our whole heart and we have not loved our neighbor as ourselves. We have failed both in what we have done and what we have left undone. As a result, things are pretty messed up in our personal lives and the world as a whole. We are all in need of saving, and not just from coronavirus.

But God doesn’t give up on us, and never will. Jesus’s journey to the cross demonstrates just how far God is willing to go for us. Jesus’s resurrection assures us that God will ultimately be successful in putting right all that has gone wrong. Good will eventually triumph over evil, in spite of all our failings.  “For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the LORD, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

And that’s good news to me.

 

 

 

Jesus Wept

Fifth Sunday in Lent, Year A

Jesus wept. John 11:35

The readings for this week include both the story of Ezekiel’s vision of the valley of dry bones and the story of the raising of Lazarus. I’ve previously written about Ezekiel’s vision in a post titled “”When All Is Lost” . What stands out to me today in rereading these stories is the theme that “nothing is impossible with God.” When the world is falling apart around us and God seems so far away that we wonder if he’s really there, these stories remind us that even if we think all is lost, it really isn’t.

Why did Jesus weep at Lazarus’s tomb? Jesus, more than anyone, had faith to know that nothing is impossible with God. He knew, as did Martha, that death was not God’s final answer. He knew that Lazarus was going to walk out of that tomb, restored to health and wholeness, in just a few minutes. So why did he weep?

Luke records another time when Jesus wept. In Luke’s memory,this took place on the way to his triumphal arrival into Jerusalem, an event we remember each year on Palm Sunday.  “And when he drew near and saw the city, he wept over it, saying, “Would that you, even you, had known on this day the things that make for peace! But now they are hidden from your eyes. For the days will come upon you, when your enemies will set up a barricade around you and surround you and hem you in on every side and tear you down to the ground, you and your children within you. Matthew records Jesus lamenting, Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing. Look, your house is left to you desolate.” A short time later, in the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus tells his friends that “My soul is overwhelmed with sorrow to the point of death.” as he wrestles with the knowledge of what is to come.

Jesus was not immune to being overwhelmed by feelings of sadness and fear. As Isaiah had foreseen, “He was despised and rejected— a man of sorrows, acquainted with deepest griefSince Christians believe that Jesus was without sin, it follows that sadness isn’t sin, despite what some people with faulty theologies may say. We aren’t sad because of a lack of faith; we are sad because we are human.  Faith isn’t a spiritual mood-altering drug that blunts the affect. It is the assurance that “though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is the ruler yet.

Feelings aren’t wrong or sinful; it’s what we do with those feelings that counts. For example, courage doesn’t mean not being afraid; it means acknowledging those fears and doing the right thing anyway. In the story of the raising of Lazarus, there’s a nice little side story about Thomas, who is my favorite disciple. Unlike some of the other disciples, Thomas was a realist who understood pretty clearly that things were not going to go well for Jesus or his followers in the short term. While James and John were planning seating arrangements for an imminent messianic victory, Thomas has his eyes wide open, “Let us also go, that we may die with him.

It is not contradictory to affirm that “with God, all things are possible” and to also know that very difficult days may lie ahead. One may be convinced that “God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose” while accepting that not all things that happen are good, or from God. God didn’t cause Lazarus to get sick and die, and God didn’t cause the current coronavirus pandemic either. Jesus wept over the death of Lazarus, and he wept over the suffering he saw coming for Jerusalem. And I believe Jesus still weeps over all the pain and suffering in the world.

As the writer of Ecclesiastes observed, there is “a time to weep and a time to laugh, a time to mourn and a time to dance“. It was okay for Jesus to weep, and it’s okay for us to weep too. It is entirely appropriate to mourn both those we have lost, and the loss of our way of life. Things will never be the same again. Perhaps some good can come out of this very bad time, but now is a time to weep. Let’s not make things worse for those who mourn by questioning their faith.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

The commandments “Do not commit adultery,” “Do not murder,” “Do not steal,” “Do not covet,” and any other commandments, are summed up in this one decree: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Love does no wrong to its neighbor. Therefore love is the fulfillment of the Law. Romans 13:9-10

The Chinese word for “crisis‘ is often referenced by various political figures and motivational speakers as being composed of the symbol for “danger” combined with the symbol for “opportunity”. While that translation may not be factually true in a linguistic sense, it is nevertheless a true observation of reality. And this particular crisis has brought into sharp focus two very different ways of seeing opportunity in the face of danger.

One way of seeing is “every man for himself”. In any crisis, there are some who will look for ways to enrich themselves, such as  this man who went around buying all the hand sanitizer he could find in order to resell it at exorbitant prices. People are hoarding toilet paper to such an extent that stores can’t keep it on shelves, and in some places actual fights have broken out over the last rolls. There are not enough face masks and gloves for medical personnel because those, too, are being stockpiled by fearful or profit-minded individuals. Gun and ammunition sales have also increased dramatically. And then there are those who ignore the advice to stay home whenever possible in an attempt to “flatten the curve“, perhaps because they see themselves as being young and therefore invulnerable.

The other way of seeing is “all for one, and one for all”. In any crisis, there are some who will look for ways to help others. They apply the admonition, “Whoever has two tunics should share with him who has none, and whoever has food should do the same.” to toilet paper and hand sanitizer.  There are some young, healthy people who will volunteer to go shopping for those who are older or have underlying health conditions which put them more at risk. There are those who will reach out to those who may be feeling lonely or isolated by making phone or video calls. There are those who will use social media not to spread rumors and fear, but accurate information and connection.

From Genesis to Revelation, the Bible is pretty clear which way of seeing is preferred by God. Cain asked God, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” and the answer given by Moses, the prophets, and Jesus is a resounding yes. Jesus illustrates his understanding of God’s way of seeing in many parables: the sheep and the goats in Matthew 25; the rich man and Lazarus in Luke 16; and the rich fool  in Luke 12. He used fruit trees as a metaphor to describe the differences in behavior that arise from the two ways of seeing:  “Even so, every good tree bears good fruit, but a bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a bad tree bear good fruit.

Paul expounded further on the fruit metaphor in his letter to the Galatians, ” The acts of the flesh are obvious: sexual immorality, impurity and debauchery; idolatry and witchcraft; hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions and envy; drunkenness, orgies, and the like. I warn you, as I did before, that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God. But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,  gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. I don’t see these as a laundry list of sins to avoid and virtues to cultivate, but as examples of actions that are the result of two different ways of seeing. All the things on Paul’s bad list are the result of seeing with self-centered eyes. All the things on Paul’s good list are the result of seeing with the eyes of love.

The writer of the letter of 1 John implores his readers to “love one another, because love comes from God” Like Jesus, John sees a clear dividing line between those who demonstrate love and those who demonstrate selfishness. “Everyone who loves has been born of God and knows God. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love“.

It is a truth universally acknowledged that “with great power comes great responsibility”. Perhaps it is also true that “with great danger comes great opportunity”. The question is: what kind of opportunity will we see? If we see ways to help ourselves at the expense of others, we are seeing with eyes of selfishness. If we see ways to help our fellow humans, we are seeing with eyes of love.

With eyes of love, we will seek to “do no harm” by following “best practices” advice from the medical community, which currently includes social distancing as much as possible. With eyes of love, we will seek to “do good” in whatever ways we can. With eyes of love, we can use this crisis to deepen our relationship with God by spending more time in Bible study and prayer.

May we keep our gaze pointed in the right direction.

 

 

Devil’s Bargain

 

Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. He fasted forty days and forty nights, and afterwards he was famished. The tempter came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become loaves of bread.” But he answered, “It is written, ‘One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.'” Then the devil took him to the holy city and placed him on the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down; for it is written, ‘He will command his angels concerning you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.'” Jesus said to him, “Again it is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.'” Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor; and he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” Jesus said to him, “Away with you, Satan! for it is written, ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve only him.'” Then the devil left him, and suddenly angels came and waited on him. Matthew 4:1-11

There are hundreds of stories about people who make deals with the devil, of which Faust is probably the most well known. Usually these stories end badly for the deal-makers, although some of the more modern variations on the story have the protagonist outwitting the devil in some way. There’s the short story of the devil and Daniel Webster, the musical Damn Yankees, and of course, the bluegrass song “The Devil Went Down to Georgia”. Joseph Campbell and C S Lewis might say that when similar stories pop up again and again in different times and places, that’s because there’s an underlying truth to them.

Matthew, Mark, and Luke tell us that Jesus’s encounter with the devil took place right after his baptism and affirmation by God as “my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. Before beginning his public ministry, Jesus needed to decide exactly how he ought to go about that ministry. And so he goes into the wilderness alone, away from the distractions of everyday life, to think and to listen for God’s direction. But before he hears the voice of God, he hears another voice, a voice that is not from God.

The voice of the devil takes advantage of Jesus’s hunger and suggests that he use his superhuman power to turn rocks into food. Not only would that alleviate his immediate physical distress, it would assuredly yield great results if he duplicated the trick for others. And feeding hungry people is a good thing, right? And it would certainly get people’s attention quickly, and garner him a lot of followers. (That’s exactly what happened later when, out of compassion, Jesus multiplied the loaves and fishes for a hungry crowd that had come to hear him)

But Jesus said no to this idea. Although he was deeply concerned about people’s physical needs (see Matthew 25) he knew that there was more to his mission than being a one-man food bank. “Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.” I’ve often heard it said that the purpose of this quote was to say that there are things in life that are more important than food, but I think there’s more to it than that. God’s words, as recorded again and again in both the Law and the Prophets, tell us that taking care of those marginalized by society is not an option, but an imperative. Those who have should share with those who have not. And it’s not just an individual, but a corporate responsibility. God will judge rulers and societies by how well they live by these words. Jesus knew that God had already told people how societies ought to function, but that they mostly ignored or disobeyed those instructions. “These people come near to me with their mouth and honor me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me.” A one-man, or even a one God-man relief operation wasn’t the answer. The hearts of many would need to be changed, the law “written on their hearts”  before the kingdom of God could begin to spread exponentially. Jesus foresaw a time when his followers would do even more in the way of helping people than he had been able to help during his short time on Earth.

The voice of the devil also suggested that Jesus could jump off a tall building in the middle of town, then supernaturally float to the ground and land unharmed. That would get the attention of a lot of people, right? They would pay attention to someone who could perform a stunt like that, yes?

But Jesus said no to this idea too. “Do not put the Lord your God to a test“. This scene reminds me of “King Herod’s Song” in “Jesus Christ Superstar” where Herod taunts Jesus to “prove to me that you’re no fool; walk across my swimming pool” Demanding signs from God is not only arrogant, it’s ultimately ineffective. In the stories of the Exodus, Moses found that to be true again and again. Pharaoh remained unconvinced by Moses’s staff turning into a snake and most of the plagues.The children of Israel seemed to have had extremely short attention spans, for in spite of witnessing multiple supernatural events, kept whining and complaining. As Jesus told in the parable of the rich man and Lazarus, even the most spectacular miracle is insufficient to overcome confirmation bias. People will deny any evidence that does not conform to what they want to believe is true.If (people) do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.” Paul made the same observation when he wrote to the Corinthians that “Jews demand signs and Greeks search for wisdom, but we preach Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles

It’s also interesting to me that in this particular temptation, the devil quoted Scripture to try and get Jesus to go along with him. But Jesus knew Scripture well enough to recognize a passage taken out of context and used manipulatively , and Jesus responded with a Scripture passage of his own that was more relevant to his decision-making. One of the reasons I’m so passionate about trying to convince people to read and study the whole Bible is because I think Biblical ignorance is one of the best tools in the devil’s toolbox. Just to take one example…how long was slavery justified on “biblical” grounds? Did you know that there was once a “slave Bible” that contained passages like “slaves obey your masters but omitted all the passages that “might incite rebellion” such as Galatians 3:28 not to mention the entire book of Exodus? That was a devilish use of the Bible, and unfortunately there are many more examples of the Bible being used in devilish ways.

The voice of the devil then makes an offer he thinks Jesus won’t be able to refuse. If Jesus will pledge allegiance to the devil, then the devil will make Jesus king of the world. Then Jesus will have the power to control everybody and everything. That would be a good thing, right? Jesus could make all the laws, so everybody would have to behave themselves or else. Jesus could redistribute the world’s resources any way he saw fit. And being Jesus, all his decisions would be loving and just and fair. The world would be a much better place with Jesus in charge!

But Jesus said no to that tempting offer too, referring to the first commandment. Idolatry doesn’t always come in the form of a golden calf. Idolatry is anything in which you place your ultimate allegiance and trust. Now, as in Jesus’s time, the most common idols are money, power, and pleasure. “No man can serve two masters“, Jesus warned his disciples. In Matthew’s context, Jesus was speaking specifically of money, but the warning can be generalized to other idols too. The way of the cross- the way Jesus took- is diametrically opposed to the way of power and control.  (Jesus), “being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death— even death on a cross!”  Counterintuitively, Jesus’s refusal to use his power and “come down from the cross” resulted in him becoming (as Obi-wan-Kenobi might put it) more powerful than anyone could imagine. “Therefore God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue acknowledge that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”

The sayings “power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely” and “the ends don’t justify the means” don’t come from the Bible, but those concepts are at play here in the deals the devil tries to make with Jesus. Jesus said “no” to any kind of devil’s bargain, and I think it’s incumbent upon his followers to do likewise. Real, lasting change won’t come through the love of power, but the power of love. Jesus has shown us the way.  And that’s good news to me.

Blessed Be

Fourth Sunday After the Epiphany, Year A

Screenshot 2020-01-31 09.04.09

When Jesus saw the crowds, he went up the mountain; and after he sat down, his disciples came to him. Then he began to speak, and taught them, saying: “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are those who mourn, for they will be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth. Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they will be filled. Blessed are the merciful, for they will receive mercy. Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God. Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you when people revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.” Matthew 5:1-12

“How are you?”… “I’m blessed!”
“Have a blessed day!”
“Bless you!”

“You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

In common usage, “Blessed” has become a kind of Christianese substitute for saying good luck or fortune. “I’m blessed” usually means “I appreciate all the ways life is pretty good for me right now” while “Have a blessed day” as a parting greeting is a spiritualized way to say “have a nice day”, or that you wish the person well. And of course, the custom of saying “Bless you” after someone sneezes is meant to say “I hope you don’t get sick!”

But it is obvious with even a cursory reading of the Beatitudes that Jesus wasn’t using the word in this way. Jesus describes people undergoing some very unpleasant things, things we would not want to experience, and calls them blessed, or favored by God. If we are honest, we will admit that these are not the kind of blessings we would wish for ourselves, or on others. We don’t usually equate being poor, powerless, or persecuted with blessing. Nor do we think of those consumed by grief or angst as being blessed.  The picture of blessings Jesus paints is the exact opposite of the ones painted by prosperity theologies which teach that if you are right with God, you will be healthy, wealthy, and wise.

Many people have the mistaken idea that if one is right with God, all will go well for them. Therefore, if all is not going well with someone, that person must not be right with God. They must have committed some secret sin, or they don’t have enough faith.  This particular bit of harmful and mistaken theology usually comes from individualizing and/or taking out of context selected Bible verses that support its premise. But the Bible is replete with stories of bad things happening to good people. Job is the most obvious example, but most of the prophets led pretty uncomfortable lives and many of Jesus’s earliest followers were martyred for their faith. I think it’s fair to say that most of the Biblical characters did not live comfortable, easy lives.

There are those who attempt to water down Jesus’s words by allegorizing them into something less radical.  For example, “poor in spirit” refers to those who know they need God in their lives, while “mourn” refers to those who are sorry for their sins. But that reasoning doesn’t hold up very well when reading Luke’s version of Jesus’s sermon, which is similar in content but has some differences in details.Where Matthew has Jesus saying “poor in spirit”, Luke just has the word  “poor”. Luke also has Jesus following up on the blessings with corresponding woes for those who are rich, carefree, and popular.

What if Jesus meant literally what he said? What if he wasn’t giving advice on how to behave in order to receive God’s blessing, but affirming a blessing that was already there for the kinds of people he described? What if Jesus was saying that God’s value system is quite different from society’s? What if he wanted to assure those despised or forgotten by society that God loved them and had not forgotten them?

Society favors the rich and powerful. But Jesus says that God favors the the most marginalized members of society, people without money or power or influence. Only those who are not satisfied by the kingdoms of this world are open to living in the kingdom of God.

Society favors those who have it all together, who don’t allow their own pain to spill out lest it infect others. But Jesus says that God favors those who are overwhelmed by the grief of personal loss or distressed over the state of the world. God will embrace them and hold them close.

Society favors the self-assured and self-sufficient. But Jesus says that God favors those who understand their place as one small part of a vast, complex, and interconnected universe. The earth will be well managed under their stewardship.

Society favors the ones who claw their way into the top 1%. But Jesus says that God favors social justice warriors who tirelessly work to make our world a better place for all its inhabitants. They will make the difference they seek.

Society likes to say “they made their bed; now they can lie in it”. But Jesus says that God favors the helpers, people who reach out to those who are struggling, rather than blame them for their predicament. They will find help in their own time of need.

Society looks for the quid pro quo, even when it comes to religion. Jesus says that God favors those whose motives in seeking God are not contaminated by self-interest, self-advancement, or self-promotion. They will find connection with God.

Society is tribalistic and wants to divide humanity into us-against-them groups. But Jesus says that God favors those who work for harmony and understanding among different groups and factions. They show the world what God is like.

Society will use force to compel dissidents into silence. Jesus says that God favors those who suffer because they dare speak truth to power, who are more concerned about what is right than what is expedient. They are in good company, for so many of God’s spokespeople through the ages have also been rejected.

In the Beatitudes, Jesus is sending a message of reassurance- of blessing- to those who need it most. God loves all people, but unfortunately not everyone hears that message because of the way society has distorted it.  Some think that because society has rejected and excluded them, God has too. But God doesn’t work that way. The blessings in the Beatitudes remind us that God’s concept of “winners” and “losers” differs significantly from that of society’s, or as Jesus also said, “the last shall be first and the first shall be last”.

The Beatitudes are a reminder that what really matters is not society’s acceptance or expectations, but God’s. Especially when things seem to fall apart and hope for a brighter future is an impossible dream, God is there. God knows what is going on and God understands the distress caused by living in a messed-up world. And God never ceases to work in unexpected ways through unappreciated people to accomplish God’s good intentions for the world.

And that’s good news to me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s All Small Stuff

Fifteenth Sunday After Pentecost

Whoever is faithful in a very little is faithful also in much; and whoever is dishonest in a very little is dishonest also in much. Luke 16:10

My husband and I are of that certain age where we have joined the ranks of the early-morning mall walkers. Walking is (we hope!) a relatively enjoyable way to improve our cardiovascular health, as well as helping to maintain musculoskeletal strength and flexibility. We also enjoy discussing current events and our plans for the rest of the day. But at some point, it occurred to me that our daily mall-walks could also be an exercise in practicing other-centeredness. So as we walk, we’ve made an effort to smile and say “good morning” to people as we pass. It sounds simple, but in practice it’s more difficult than you might imagine, at least for me. It’s so easy for me to slide into my own mind, becoming preoccupied with my own thoughts and worries, that I don’t even notice the people passing by.

When you start greeting people, you start noticing them as people, not just part of the background scenery. There’s an elderly couple who always dresses alike and a family pushing the wheelchair of their severely disabled adult son. There are three men walking together, each wearing a different ball cap proclaiming that they are Army, Navy, and Air Force veterans. There is a man who wears a politically themed t-shirt that I agree with, and there are others whose politically themed clothing I dislike. There’s a middle-aged daughter holding hands as she walks slowly with her mother, who I would guess may suffer from Alzheimer’s. There are young mothers who come pushing strollers and pause at certain locations to do exercises together, and there are young women who walk alone at a frantic pace and look too thin to be healthy. And once you notice them as people, you start to wonder and then to care about them.

Jesus instructed his followers to “deny yourself, take up your cross daily, and follow me“. I don’t think he meant that all of his followers must literally be crucified. In the first place, dying is kind of a one-time event, not something one could successfully perform repeatedly on a daily basis. Secondly, seeking literal martyrdom can be a self-serving, rather than an other-serving thing. As an imprisoned Paul wrote to the Philippians, “For to me, to live is Christ and to die is gain. If I am to go on living in the body, this will mean fruitful labor for me. Yet what shall I choose? I do not know! I am torn between the two: I desire to depart and be with Christ, which is better by far; but it is more necessary for you that I remain in the body.” Third, if you remove all Jesus-followers from the equation of the world, the parables of the kingdom don’t make much sense. Remove the yeast from the dough and the bread won’t rise; remove the seed from the field and there will be no crop; remove the salt from the meat and it spoils.

I think there’s a connection between being “faithful in a very little” and “take up your cross daily“. What Jesus is asking us to do is to practice thinking and caring about others and not just ourselves, to become other-centered rather than self- centered. The Good Place does an excellent job of exploring this idea. For example, the character of Tahani performs many extravagant good deeds, but viewers learn that these are motivated by her need for affirmation and approval. Her acts of charity stem from the same kind of self-centered worldview as the behavior of the more overtly selfish Eleanor. As Rick Warren puts it, “humility is not about thinking less of yourself; it is about thinking of yourself less.” And that’s hard to do. It takes practice, and that practice begins with the small stuff…like offering a friendly greeting rather than allowing myself to be preoccupied by my own thoughts.

It’s the attitude that matters, not because actions don’t matter, but because right attitudes lead to right actions and wrong attitudes often lead to ineffectual or harmful ones. Paul understood that when he advised the Corinthians squabbling over whose spiritual gifts were the best, “If I speak in the tongues of men or of angels, but do not have love, I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal. If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing. If I give all I possess to the poor and give over my body to hardship that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

The word usually translated “love” in modern versions of 1 Corinthians 13 is “agape” in Greek. In the KJV, the word is translated “charity” which may convey the concept a little better. It is not a feeling, but an attitude expressed in behavior. Paul goes on to explain, “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” Love isn’t self-centered; it’s other-centered.

Changing one’s worldview from self-centeredness to other-centeredness isn’t easy, and it doesn’t come naturally. We are all born self-centered; an infant who is hungry or uncomfortable knows only its needs, and demands that someone quickly and satisfactorily attend to them. Part of becoming mature (should I say adulting?) is learning to delay gratification and developing a realistic sense of one’s place in the universe. It’s easy to intellectually affirm that the universe doesn’t revolve around me and my needs, wants and desires, but harder to incorporate that understanding into my attitude and resultant actions.

Chaos theory postulates that a butterfly flapping its wings on one side of the world can eventually cause a hurricane on the other side of the world. I believe Jesus was a good teacher who knew how to break a desired learning outcome down into small steps, but I also believe Jesus understood the butterfly effect. Jesus asks us to pay attention to all the small stuff, because small stuff can lead to big stuff. We have no way of knowing all of the eventual consequences of our smallest actions of kindness, for ourselves and for others.

And that’s good news to me.

The Power of the Cross and the Foolishness of Power

Holy Cross

Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried. -Gilbert K. Chesterton

For the message about the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written, “I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and the discernment of the discerning I will thwart.”Where is the one who is wise? Where is the scribe? Where is the debater of this age? Has not God made foolish the wisdom of the world? For since, in the wisdom of God, the world did not know God through wisdom, God decided, through the foolishness of our proclamation, to save those who believe. For Jews demand signs and Greeks desire wisdom,but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are the called, both Jews and Greeks, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. 1 Corinthians 1:18-24

Constantine got it wrong, and in my opinion the popular understanding of what it means to be Christian has gone downhill ever since.

You may remember the legend of Constantine’s conversion. Prior to the Battle of Milvian in 312, he looked up in the sky and saw a cross of light, accompanied by the words “In this sign you will conquer”. He commanded his troops to paint their shields with a Christian symbol and sure enough, the battle went his way. Subsequently he made Christianity the official religion of the Roman empire. Christians went from being persecuted for their faith to being favored for it. Constantine used the power of his office to exempt clergy from paying some taxes and elevated them to high office. Non-Christians were required to pay for the building of Constantinople, thus giving people a financial incentive to convert. The church became rich and powerful, and in so doing obscured the message of the cross. “Whoever wants to be first among you must be last, just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many.

According to Paul, the message of the cross is not about power, but about weakness. It is not about control, but surrender. It is not about taking, but giving. It is not about self-serving, but about self-sacrifice. There’s a fragment of what appears to be an early Christian hymn in Philippians 2 which urges Christians to adapt the mindset of Jesus, “Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death—even death on a cross!

The message of the cross contrasts rather starkly with the popular understanding of how people are to find meaning and purpose in their lives, and that’s why it seems foolish to those who do not understand it. But to those who seek to incorporate the message of the cross into their daily lives, it is transformative. The message of the cross has the power to transform not only individual lives, but to transform society as well. I think tha’s what Jesus was getting at in his parables of the kingdom: it is like a tiny seed that start small, but grows into an enormous sheltering tree that gives sustenance to all living things. How different our world will be when the kingdoms of this world have become the kingdoms of our Lord and of his Christ!

And that’s good news to me.

Original Sin?

Twelfth Sunday After Pentecost

My people have committed two evils: they have forsaken me, the fountain of living water, and dug out cisterns for themselves, cracked cisterns that can hold no water. Jeremiah 2:13

The beginning of human pride is to forsake the Lord; the heart has withdrawn from its Maker. Sirach 10:12

.For all who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted.” Luke 14:10

What do you think of when you hear the phrase “original sin”? Usually, the term is applied to Adam and Eve’s disobedience to God in the Garden of Eden by eating its forbidden fruit. Some theologians, beginning with Augustine in the fourth century, have postulated that original sin is related to sexual desire. (I don’t agree with that particular theory…after all, God commanded Adam and Eve to “be fruitful and multiply” before their fall from grace, and I doubt IVF was a thing back then) As I read today’s readings I notice a common theme: they center around the harmful consequences of hubris. With that in mind, I wonder if “original sin” doesn’t go a bit further back than Eve’s first bite of the apple.

Why did Adam and Eve decide that it would be a good idea to disobey God? In the story, a talking snake persuades Eve by telling her that “God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” Did you catch that? Eve thinks that by eating the fruit, she will in some way become God’s equal. Her behavior echoes the story of Lucifer’s fall from heaven as imagined by Milton in Paradise Lost, who understood Isaiah’s prophecy against the king of Babylon as applying to a more primordial fall: How you have fallen from heaven, O Morning Star, son of the dawn! You have been cut down to the ground, O destroyer of nations. You said in your heart: “I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God.

The first law God gave those who would be his followers was “Hear, oh Israel, the Lord, the Lord thy God is one and thou shalt have no other gods before me” Too often when we read the first commandment, we apply it to other people rather than ourselves. It must apply to those idol-worshipping neighbors of Bronze Age Israel, or to those in our day who understand God differently than the American Protestant tradition teaches. But when you think about it, you realize that thinking of oneself as somehow better than or superior to other human beings is the worst kind of idolatry. Whenever we act like the universe ought to revolve around us and our wants and needs, whenever we denigrate other human beings made in the image of God in order to elevate ourselves above them, we are essentially imagining ourselves as gods. We are as foolish as Adam and Eve if we think doing that makes us in any way God’s equal. In fact, such thinking is completely opposite from the nature of God as modeled by Jesus, “who, being in very nature God,did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being made in human likeness. And being found in appearance as a man, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to death—even death on a cross!

As the great Hebrew prophets and Jesus understood it, the commandment to put God first was closely entwined with what we have come to call the Golden Rule. ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ This is the first and greatest commandment. And the second is like it: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments.” and “So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets.” We can’t claim to follow the first commandment if we routinely violate the second, because all humans are made in the image of God. If we think that we are superior to other human beings for whatever reason, we will most likely behave in harmful ways toward them.

Thoughts precede actions. As I see it, “original sin” wasn’t the act of eating the forbidden fruit, but the thought “I deserve to be on equal footing with God’. But I don’t believe God insists on having first place because he has a huge ego that needs to be stroked. Amos and the other 8th century prophets were pretty up front about that. “I hate, I despise your religious festivals; your assemblies are a stench to me. Even though you bring me burnt offerings and grain offerings,I will not accept them. Though you bring choice fellowship offerings, I will have no regard for them. Away with the noise of your songs! I will not listen to the music of your harps. But let justice roll on like a river, righteousness like a never-failing stream.” That particular brand of bad theology has recurred again and again throughout time and space, probably because people have a tendency to anthropomorphize God. They imagine God would do what humans would do if they were in God’s place, but fortunately God is not human. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,” declares the Lord. “As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts”

Instead, I think God forbids humans from assuming the place of God because God knows that when humans try to do that, other humans get hurt. Humans have an innate tendency to think of life as a zero-sum game, where some are winners and others are losers. God didn’t plan this world to be a giant game of king-of-the-mountain, where a few winners battle their way to the top by trampling on the masses of losers beneath them. God planned for all humans to live in a shared world of abundance. But that only works when humans don’t try to be gods flexing their muscles against other humans, wasting the earth’s resources on things like war and hoarding possessions. As Gandhi observed, “the world has enough for everyone’s need, but not for everyone’s greed.

This world doesn’t need a lot of little would-be gods running around ordering their fellow human beings around and mistreating them. What this world needs is more human beings who understand and accept their place in the created order, who “love thy neighbor as thyself” and who take care of the rest of creation in a responsible way.

Whether this is good news or bad news depends on your perspective. It’s good news for those whose lives are being made miserable by petty would-be human gods. It’s bad news for those who would be gods, because God won’t put up with that kind of hubris forever. Jesus began his ministry by quoting these words from Isaiah, “The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners  and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor. “

I think that’s rather good news. How about you?

The Reason for the Rules

Eleventh Sunday After Pentecost

Now he was teaching in one of the synagogues on the sabbath. And just then there appeared a woman with a spirit that had crippled her for eighteen years. She was bent over and was quite unable to stand up straight.When Jesus saw her, he called her over and said, “Woman, you are set free from your ailment.”When he laid his hands on her, immediately she stood up straight and began praising God. But the leader of the synagogue, indignant because Jesus had cured on the sabbath, kept saying to the crowd, “There are six days on which work ought to be done; come on those days and be cured, and not on the sabbath day.”But the Lord answered him and said, “You hypocrites! Does not each of you on the sabbath untie his ox or his donkey from the manger, and lead it away to give it water? And ought not this woman, a daughter of Abraham whom Satan bound for eighteen long years, be set free from this bondage on the sabbath day?”When he said this, all his opponents were put to shame; and the entire crowd was rejoicing at all the wonderful things that he was doing. Luke 13:10-17

“We are a nation of laws”. How many times have you heard that statement, and in what context? Too often it is cited as justification for behavior that causes harm directly or indirectly to human beings created in God’s image. It’s against the law to cross the border without permission, even when fleeing persecution or famine. “Urban camping” is against the law, even if you are homeless and have nowhere else to go. In Arizona, members of a faith group are being prosecuted under littering laws for leaving jugs of water in the desert for travellers who might otherwise die of thirst.

The reason we have laws and rules is to serve and protect people. It’s against the law to murder, to rape, to steal, and to commit perjury, and for good reason. It’s against the law to run red lights, to speed, and to drive under the influence, and there is good reason for those too. But there are some laws and rules that are just pointless, silly, or outdated. Unfortunately there are some laws that are applied in ways that cause more harm than good, as the heartbreaking story of the death of Eric Garner attests. And also unfortunately, laws and rules are often applied unequally. Rich and powerful people get away with things that the poor and powerless are punished for doing, which is a pretty blatant violation of levitical law.

The passage from Luke above is just one of many where Jesus disputed with those who believed that people exist to serve and protect rules, rather than the other way around. God’s purpose in instituting the Sabbath was so that people and animals would not be worked to death. It was meant to be a blessing to people, not a burden, but over many years Sabbath-observation evolved into an absolute rule that must be followed regardless of the harm it might cause. Jesus believed that”The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath” I don’t long for a return to the “blue laws” of the recent past, but I do long for a restoration of the principle of Sabbath. When people have to work two and three jobs to make ends meet, when workers in poultry processing plants are forced to wear diapers because they aren’t allowed bathroom breaks, when factory and warehouse workers have their every move followed and critiqued for efficiency, there is something profoundly wrong.

Jesus wasn’t the only one who got into trouble with those who prioritize rules over people. Peter and the other first apostles did too. When they were commanded to stop telling others about Jesus, they responded “We must serve God rather than human authority.” Too often rules serve to protect those in power, rather than all people. Paul got into trouble in Ephesus for cutting into business profits by sharing the message of Jesus.”God’s Smuggler”, Brother Andrew, who famously smuggled Bibles across the Iron Curtain, followed the same rationale when he wrote “The Ethics of Smuggling

“The law” does not have ultimate moral priority. Once upon a time in Europe, Hitler’s “Final Solution” was the law of the land, and it was illegal to shelter Jews. Once upon a time in America, slavery was legal and harboring runaway slaves was illegal. Once upon a time in South Africa, apartheid was legal and racial mixing was illegal. Once upon a time in the fictional universe, Jean Valjean was relentlessly pursued by Inspector Javert for stealing bread to feed his starving family. And in many places today, publicly identifying as a follower of Jesus is prohibited by law and violators are prosecuted and punished.

Ultimate moral priority is of divine, not human origin, and I agree with Jesus and Paul’s interpretation of God’s moral priorities: In everything, then, do to others as you would have them do to you. For this is the essence of the Law and the prophets” and ” For the entire law is fulfilled in keeping this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” Our ultimate loyalty should be to serve God’s moral priorities, not human ones. “But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your ancestors served beyond the Euphrates, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD ” Depending on the time and place in which one lives, that kind of loyalty can be scary or even dangerous.

Good news? That’s where faith comes in. I believe that by following God’s moral priorities, God’s followers have the power to transform the world into the kind of place God intended when he created it. And that is good news to me.

Won’t You Be a Neighbor?

Fifth Sunday After Pentecost

Just then a lawyer stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he said, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”He said to him, “What is written in the law? What do you read there?”He answered, “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.” And he said to him, “You have given the right answer; do this, and you will live.”But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?” Jesus replied, “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, and fell into the hands of robbers, who stripped him, beat him, and went away, leaving him half dead.Now by chance a priest was going down that road; and when he saw him, he passed by on the other side.So likewise a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side.But a Samaritan while traveling came near him; and when he saw him, he was moved with pity.He went to him and bandaged his wounds, having poured oil and wine on them. Then he put him on his own animal, brought him to an inn, and took care of him.The next day he took out two denarii, gave them to the innkeeper, and said, ‘Take care of him; and when I come back, I will repay you whatever more you spend.’Which of these three, do you think, was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of the robbers?”He said, “The one who showed him mercy.” Jesus said to him, “Go and do likewise.” Luke 10:25-37

This week’s lectionary reading includes the parable of the Good Samaritan, which I am afraid is so overly familiar that it has lost much of its original impact. As is usual in Jesus’s storytelling, he takes an ordinary tale and adds a startling twist.

The ordinary tale was that of a man who was the victim of a vicious mugging. Then, as now, was distressingly common enough to perhaps not even make the evening news. The character of the injured man is, I think deliberately, not fleshed out. Was he a citizen or an immigrant? Did he take unnecessary risks in traveling alone down a road known to have been frequented by robbers? Was he unarmed, or armed yet overwhelmed by his assailants? Could he have been drinking and thus wasn’t paying sufficient attention to his surroundings? We don’t know his ethnicity or religion, or whether he was rich or poor. None of these things is important to the story. What is important is that he is a person who needed help.

The injured man was ignored by a priest and a Levite, who like the lawyer who asked Jesus the question that occasioned this story, would have been among the educated, religious elite of the day. (Lawyer in this context is an expert in the Torah, a religious academic) The two men who crossed the road to avoid the victim should have known the Torah well enough to be aware that it was their moral responsibility to help the injured man. Why didn’t they? What excuse did they come up with to convince themselves to cross the road and leave the man to die? Like the priest and the Levite, the Bible scholar who questioned Jesus would have known the scriptures well enough to know there was no good justification for their actions. Again, Jesus doesn’t mention anything about what might be going on in their heads, and I think that was also deliberate. Jesus wanted those listening to the story, including us, to fill in the blanks with our own possible excuses for failing to help when it is within our power to do so.

The story takes an unexpected turn when a Samaritan, a despised outsider, stops to help the man and becomes the hero of Jesus’s story. Since the time of Ezra and Nehemiah, Samaritans had been spurned by the stringent religiously observant because their bloodlines were thought to be impure. Not all the people of Israel were deported to Assyria or Babylon at the time of the exile; some of “the poorer people of the land” were allowed to remain. When the exiles returned to rebuild Jerusalem, they refused help from the locals because it was suspected that they might have intermarried with people who could not trace their ancestry back to one of the original twelve tribes of Israel. Bad feelings between the two groups of God-worshipers intensified in the centuries between the time of Ezra and the time of Jesus. Talk about polarization! Truly, there is “nothing new under the sun“.

When the story ends, Jesus delivers a zinger. The lawyer had begun by asking Jesus, “Who is my neighbor?” Jesus changes the focus of the question by asking, “Who acted like a neighbor?” I don’t know if Jesus had ever studied the Socratic method of teaching, but he had it down pat. There was only one answer the lawyer could give: the Samaritan. Luke doesn’t tell us how this very serious student of the Bible reacted, but the inevitable answer must have felt like a punch to the gut. The Samaritans were despised by the lawyer and other “purebloods” for not obeying what they understood to be God’s clear command forbidding intermarriage with non-Israelites lest they fall into idolatry. Yet in this story it is not the priest, not the Levite, not the Torah scholar, but the Samaritan who understands the heart of the Torah best.

Who is my neighbor” is the wrong question. “Who is my neighbor” seeks to limit neighborly behavior to those who somehow deserve it. The question we should be asking ourselves instead is “am I being a neighbor?” If I am being a neighbor, I am not limiting my compassion to those who I think deserve it. If I am being a neighbor, I will try to help whoever I can whenever I have the opportunity to do so. My actions should not be dependent on what is in the heart of the other, but what is in my own heart.

God causes the sun to shine and the rain to fall on the just and the unjust. God pours out his blessings on all of us freely, without regard for whether we deserve them our not. God showed his great love for us when Christ died for us while we were yet sinners. God is continually asking us “Won’t you be my neighbor?” even when we run away from God and behave in very un-neighborly ways to each other. God invites us to “go and do likewise“and be a neighbor to everyone we meet on this road of life.

And that’s good news to me.