Don’t Blink

Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come. But understand this: If the owner of the house had known at what time of night the thief was coming, he would have kept watch and would not have let his house be broken into. So you also must be ready, because the Son of Man will come at an hour when you do not expect him.“Who then is the faithful and wise servant, whom the master has put in charge of the servants in his household to give them their food at the proper time? It will be good for that servant whose master finds him doing so when he returns.Truly I tell you, he will put him in charge of all his possessions. But suppose that servant is wicked and says to himself, ‘My master is staying away a long time,’ and he then begins to beat his fellow servants and to eat and drink with drunkards. The master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he is not aware of. He will cut him to pieces and assign him a place with the hypocrites, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Matthew 24: 42-51

This week’s post isn’t from the lectionary, but from some thoughts I’ve had in the wake of a recent personal experience.

My husband and I were driving home on the last leg of a vacation trip to visit with my family, and my mother had given me several boxes of old family photos and other memorabilia for me to sort through. We were almost home when suddenly a car veered into our lane and hit us, sending our car into a cable barrier separating traffic moving in the opposite direction. It all happened very quickly, and there was nothing I could have done that would have prevented the accident. We were very fortunate in many respects; there were no injuries to people, only to vehicles. The seat belts, air bags, and cable barrier all did what they were designed to do, absorbing much of the force of the collision and preventing our vehicle from being forced into oncoming traffic moving at freeway speeds. Unpleasant as the experience was, it could have been much, much worse. We could have easily found ourselves in the direct presence of God much sooner than we expected, with our children left to sort through all we left behind.

In the passage above (see a slightly different take in Mark here) Jesus was responding to questions about when the world as we know it would end. As I wrote in last week’s post on the parable of the Good Samaritan, he responds by telling his hearers they are asking the wrong question. It’s not important to know when the world will end, or when Jesus will return. What is important is what you are doing in the meantime. Are you living the way he taught, or aren’t you?

Growing up in the Baptist church, I heard many sermons on this passage, but as I recall, they all centered around the necessity of a personal conversion experience. You might die at any moment, and if you weren’t right with God when that happened, you would find yourself in a place hotter than Phoenix in the summer for all eternity. I was so traumatized by a sermon I heard as a young child about a boy who was bitten by a rattlesnake in his sleep that I had problems with insomnia and ophidiophobia for years. Then there were the ones which made a dramatic show of imitating the sounds of a heart beating, then stopping, all the while warning us that God could likewise stop our hearts at any second, so we’d better scurry down the aisle on the first verse of the invitational hymn, if not sooner.

But as I read and think about this passage now, I think those sermons were missing the point Jesus was trying to make. Yes, your life could end at at any moment, and you have as little control over it as I did over my auto accident. But in the judgement scene described by Jesus here, those who were commended and those who were condemned were both described as servants, so the criteria doesn’t seem to be based on different theological beliefs. The difference between the two groups was that the servants in the first group were taking care of their fellow servants, while those in the second group were taking advantage of them. The parable of the sheep and the goats in the next chapter is a variation on the same theme, but goes even further. You don’t have to be actively abusing others to find yourself on God’s bad side, just ignoring them.

None of us knows how much time we have left on planet Earth, but what we do know is that we’re supposed to make the most of whatever time we have. And if we are following in the way of Jesus, we have a pretty good idea of what that entails. Love your neighbor as yourself. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Or, as L R Knost has written, “Love intentionally, extravagantly, unconditionally. The broken world waits in darkness for the light that is you.”

Make it count.

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Author: joantheexpatriatebaptist

Retired high school science teacher and guidance counselor. Sci-fi, fantasy, and theology geek who also enjoys music and gardening.

2 thoughts on “Don’t Blink”

  1. Lorraine, most of my adult life, I knew mother was terrified of dying. You know she was obsessed with prophecy, especially anything about judgement. She was absolutely positive God was going to send her to help (which we know isn’t a biblical theology). And we both know and can guess why she thought she was going to hell. She was so wrapped up in her own terror, she didn’t realize what she unintentionally did to others. It made me so sad that she didn’t accept forgiveness and love, only punishment. She sure beat that too my head. I’m grateful most of it didn’t stick. I do believe in forgiveness and love and joy in the Lord.

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    1. I am sorry that both you and she went through that. She was probably a victim of hearing the same kind of sermons I did, and absorbed their bad theology. Bad theology is about power and control, not the love that is the heart of the gospel. God loves us, and wants us to love others. Simple to understand but often difficult to practice. I believe God applauds our efforts in the same way a parent applauds their toddler’s first steps. He knows we are not perfect and never will be, but he is pleased when we make the effort to walk in the ways of Jesus.

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