Mark: The Kingdom is at Hand

“The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel.”

Mark is the shortest of the four gospels and probably the first to be written. Tradition attributes it to John Mark, Simon Peter’s protégé, who was also possibly the young man who fled naked from Jesus’s arrest scene. Mark’s telling of the Jesus story certainly seems in line with the way I imagine Peter would have told it: action oriented and fast-moving.  There is an urgency in Mark’s gospel; he repeatedly uses the adverb “immediately” as he describes events unfolding. If I had to assign the four gospels Myers-Briggs types, Mark would be an SP. Mark is the Captain Kirk of the New Testament.

As I read the Bible, I try to strip away any preconceived notions of what something might mean, and put myself in the place of one hearing its words for the first time. “The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent, and believe the good news” seems to have been central to the messages of both John the Baptist and Jesus. It’s really quite startling when taken at face value: the waiting is over. The long-promised and imagined reign of God begins here, now. Those who want to be part of it are instructed to “repent and believe the good news”. But how can this be the correct understanding?  It has been two thousand years since Jesus made this proclamation. I don’t see too many nations beating their swords into plowshares or wolves lying down with lambs, much less everyone living to a ripe old age under their own vines and fig trees. As Longfellow wrote, “Hate is strong and mocks the song of peace on earth, good will to men”

For many evangelicals, “repenting and believing the good news” means that once you agree to a correct set of theological propositions, and say the right words, you will go to heaven when you die instead of hell.  And although this salvation is a free gift from God, new converts usually quickly are confronted with a new set of behavioral rules, which can vary considerably among different churches. But I can’t get away from the fact that Jesus consistently preached that the reign of God had begun before his crucifixion and resurrection. In addition, he also claimed power to forgive sins prior to his death on the cross. In fact, proclamations like these were exactly what caused the orthodox religious establishment to push for the death penalty. I think Jesus meant exactly what he said: the kingdom of God begins here and now. His crucifixion and his resurrection sealed the deal and proved it.  If the reign of God hasn’t been realized in the way or as quickly as his earliest followers expected, it isn’t for lack of trying on God’s part. Religious history has often had a bad track record when it comes to understanding God and what he wants us to do in his name.

I think that the meaning of Jesus’s imperative to “repent and believe the good news” has been dumbed down to the point of being totally misunderstood, if not downright distorted. “Repent”does not simply mean to stop doing x and start doing y, nor does it primarily refer to emotional responses such as guilt, regret, or remorse. The root of the word  carries the idea of changing directions, of seeing everything completely differently. “I once was blind, but now I see”. Matthew, Mark, and Luke use the word “repent” to describe this process; John uses the metaphor of “being born again”. We might call it a paradigm shift. As I understand from Jesus’s teachings and actions, what we are to turn away from is the infantile idea that “the world ought to revolve around me” and the self-centered behavior that kind of thinking produces. Instead, as we begin to understand ourselves as part of a greater whole and begin to draw energy and purpose from God, our behavior becomes increasingly other-centered.

Similarly, “believe” does not refer to intellectual assent, but to actions congruent with trust and confidence in the object of one’s faith. “So then, by their fruit you will recognize them. Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of My Father in heaven and “You believe that God is one. You are doing well! Even the demons believe that, and shudder!”  

The good news is not just that there will be “pie in the sky bye and bye when we die”, although I certainly think there will be pie. If we who claim to “believe” in Jesus would do a better job of practicing what Jesus taught, we might find ourselves surprised by the results. Kindness is contagious, and the smallest acts of it can multiply exponentially. Imagine what the world would be like if more people attempted to follow the principles of the Greatest Commandment and  Golden Rule, which form the backbone of Jesus’s teachings. The world would indeed be a different place.

I think it’s a mistake to think that the kingdom of God is something meant only for the future, whether we think of that as something that will happen in the afterlife or something that will happen after Christ’s return. When asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, Jesus replied, “The kingdom of God will not come with observable signs. Nor will people say, ‘Look, here it is,’ or ‘There it is.’ For you see, the kingdom of God is in your midst.” and What shall we say the kingdom of God is like, or what parable shall we use to describe it? It is like a mustard seed, which is the smallest of all seeds on earth. Yet when planted, it grows and becomes the largest of all garden plants, with such big branches that the birds can perch in its shade.”

The reign of God has already begun, and the Kingdom of God is growing. The arc of the moral universe may be so long as to be imperceptible, but it still bends towards justice. God has already given us all we need for “thy kingdom come, thy will be done on earth as it is heaven” God trusts us enough to put the ball in our court. That’s exciting and amazing, and it’s good news to me.

 

 

 

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Author: joantheexpatriatebaptist

Retired high school science teacher and guidance counselor. Sci-fi, fantasy, and theology geek who also enjoys music and gardening.

One thought on “Mark: The Kingdom is at Hand”

  1. “The reign of God has already begun, and the Kingdom of God is growing.” I totally agree, the kingdom is here, and it is growing. But we cannot count churches or Christians to determine its size, because the kingdom is not the same as visible churches and Christians.

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